Nau mai, haere mai, welcome to EyeContact. You are invited to respond to reviews and contribute to discussion by registering to participate.

JH

Gideon Rubin Paintings

AA
View Discussion
Gideon Rubin, Untitled, 2020, detail, oil on linen, 51 x 46 cm Gideon Rubin, Untitled, 2020, oil on linen, 51 x 46 cm Gideon Rubin, Hair Clip, 2020, oil on linen, 50.5 x 50 cm Gideon Rubin, Hair Clip, 2020, detail, oil on linen, 50.5 x 50 cm Gideon Rubin, White Hair Band, 2020, oil on linen, 55 x 60 cm Gideon Rubin, White Hair Band, 2020, detail, oil on linen, 55 x 60 cm Gideon Rubin, Untitled, 2020, oil on linen, 60 x 55 cm Installation of Gideon Rubin's 'We Thought It Was Heaven Tomorrow' in Fox Jensen McCrory. Gideon Rubin, Untitled, 2020, oil on linen, 46.5 x 50.5 cm Gideon Rubin, White Tote, 2020, oil on linen, 30.5 x 25.5 cm Gideon Rubin, Father and Son, 2019, oil on linen, 30.5 x 25.5 cm Gideon Rubin: Undressing, 2020, oil on linen, 25.5 x 20.5 cm; Tights, 2020, oil on linen, 61 x 91 cm Gideon Rubin, Tights, 2020, oil on linen, 61 x 91 cm Gideon Rubin: White Tote, 2020, oil on linen, 30.5 x 25.5 cm; Untitled, 2020, oil on canvas, 33.5 x 30.5 cm Gideon Rubin, Untitled, 2020, oil on canvas, 33.5 x 30.5 cm Gideon Rubin, Black Shoe, 2019, oil on canvas, 90 x 80 cm

Richter’s much reproduced iconic image is photorealist and preoccupied with light, pattern and texture as a delicate means of expressing attentive paternal love. Rubin’s version takes it in another direction. It is much looser (in photographed hair treatment and painted marks) and not fetishistic as perhaps might be expected.

Auckland

 

Gideon Rubin
We Thought It Was Heaven Tomorrow


4 February - 13 March 2021

London-based Israeli painter Gideon Rubin is currently presenting a collection of head and clothed figure images at Fox Jensen McCrory, accomplished oil paintings that demonstrate tight chromatic and tonal control—in the typically restrained ‘English’ manner that is the opposite of highly saturated ‘Pacific Light’ colour.

Rubin likes to work from found magazine photographs, and the most prevalent motif (four times) is that of a young woman with her hair in a bun or ponytail, with her head facing away from the artist. Rubin is clearly inspired by Gerhard Richter’s famous painting of his daughter, Betty, 1988.

Richter’s much reproduced iconic image is photorealist and preoccupied with light, pattern and texture as a delicate means of expressing attentive paternal love. Rubin’s version takes it in another direction. It is much looser (in photographed hair treatment and painted marks) and not fetishistic as perhaps might be expected. Paint as applied substance is accentuated, the rendered hair—as depicted content—not being a living entity or organ substitute. The materiality of oil paint, the methodology, is what is being celebrated; the joy of positioning and manipulating carefully chosen viscous pigments; the pleasure also of linking up simple shapes through juxtaposition.

Among the smaller paintings, there are some lovely old fashioned (intimate) works that are often reminiscent of Vuillard or Renoir, or even early Woollaston. The codification of feeling is usually done through tactile surfaces and planar nuance. For example, White Tote (2020) and Father and Son (2019) utilise thin liquid paint, the former revelling in the infusing textures of dark vertical dribbles—creating (via staining) a different mood from the more vigorously linear head /hair studies that use thicker paint and highlight the brush as linear tool.

This is a traditional show that escapes being stuffy. It nods to the western history of painting and embraces pleasure through the delights of image construction: its process. Some might argue it thrives on voyeurism but I think that is a mistake that marginalises the artisanal; the prolonged skilled labour in the atelier. It ignores the psychological dynamics of making (something separate from looking—I know that is contentious) and the urgent necessities of manuality: through meticulous daubing, the doing.

John Hurrell

Print | Facebook | Twitter | Email

 

Recent Posts by John Hurrell

JH
Jane Zusters, At home Wetlands Grove, Bexley, 2013 C-type print

Jane Zusters Photographs

THE JAMES WALLACE ARTS TRUST

Auckland

 

Jane Zusters
Te Karoro Karoro: A Place Called Home: The Red Zone Clearances: Christchurch Ōtautahi


14 April - 30 May 2021

JH
Still from Rangituhia Hollis' Across the Face of the Moon, 2020, 10.33 minutes, digital video, sound

I Decline to Taste the Casein Air

ARTSPACE AOTEAROA

Auckland

 

Hollis, Iti, Monteith, Monu, Pastrana
Sovereign Pacific / Pacific Sovereigns



13 April -15 May 2020

JH
Gregory Bennett, Embowered II, 2021, still, HD video; 7 minutes, 30 seconds, looped variable.

Three Bennett Videos

TWO ROOMS

Auckland

 

Gregory Bennett
Edifice


23 April - 28 May 2021

JH
Installation detail of Elizabeth Thomson's Lateral Theories' at Two Rooms. Photo: Sam Hartnett.

Thomson’s Evocative ‘Planets’

TWO ROOMS

Auckland

 

Elizabeth Thomson
Lateral Theories

 

22 April - 28 May 2021